Ask the Experts

If you need further assistance please contact our experts who will be glad to help you.

Please enter a valid name
Please enter a valid email address
Please enter a message
Please agree to our data terms before submitting your enquiry.

Technical support and user guide information

Technical Support
When would I need a free movement cylinder?

A free movement cylinder allows a key to operate the cylinder even when there is already a key inserted in the other end. These cylinders are for use on emergency exit door lock kits such as the 870 and 871. This function ensures that when the panic bar or panic lever is pushed the cam will rotate freely.

This type of cylinder is also recommended for use with the FUHR 881 Electromechanical Door Lock.

What types of door handle are there?

There are three popular types of door handle. Refer to our website or catalogue for the full range of brands, designs and colour options.

 

Lever / Lever

Levers on the inside and outside of the door.

Ideal for use with a lever operated multipoint door locking mechanism.

 

Lever / Moving Pad

Lever on the inside and a moving pad on the outside of the door.

Moving pads are usually used with split or dual spindle multipoint door locking mechanisms.

 

Lever / Fixed Pad

Lever on the inside and a fixed pad on the outside of the door.

Fixed pads are used with key wind up locks

 

What type of locking points are there for doors?

What is TS 007 1 star and 3 star?
Article Image

 

The CFG1* cylinder is accredited with one star TS007 security classification which means that, when combined with a two star handle, such as the Sparta 2* or Hoppe PAS 24 handle, full TS007 3* accreditation can be achieved.

The CFG3* Kitemarked cylinder boasts 3 star TS 007 accreditation, Secured by Design certification and is PAS 24 compliant.

What is the difference between restricted and open profile cylinders?

Restricted profile cylinders / key systems are non-duplicable, meaning it’s impossible to purchase blank keys in the market and create fraudulent keys. These cylinders provide a higher level of security.

On the other hand, open profile cylinders mean that any key cutter on the market can make replacement cuts and the cylinders can then be mastered from this. This can sometimes be a homeowner’s preference as it is easier to get additional keys cut.

What is PAS 23 and PAS 24?

Both of these relate to performance, manufacturing and test standards for doors.

 

PAS23

PAS 23 tests performance requirements for door assemblies, to achieve the standard a door set is subjected to a series of tests, which include:

  • Wind and water tightness
  • Cycle testing etc

Every component used within the door set tested, must comply to the relevant British Standard for that component before they can be put forward for testing to PAS 23.

PAS 23 is incorporated under the standard BS EN 14351-1:2006 for windows and doors which covers product standards, performance and characteristics.

 

PAS 24

PAS 24 is an enhanced security performance test for door assembly requirements, like PAS 23 every component used within the door set tested must comply to the relevant British Standard for that component.

PAS 24 covers the same requirements as PAS 23 with additional security tests, such as:

  • Manual intervention
  • Mechanical loading
  • Hard and soft body impact

An example of the intensity of the testing, the mechanical loading tests subjects the door set to 4.5Kn of pressure, the equivalent of approximately 45 times the pressure used to tighten a car wheel nut.

What is BS EN 1303?

BS EN 1303 is a British Standard for cylinders. It is broken down into 8 digits and ensures that the cylinders are tested to the highest standard. The 8 digits are; Category of Use, Durability, Test Door Mass, Fire Resistance, Safety, Corrosion and Temperature Resistance, Key Related Security and Attack Resistance.

Cylinders are graded based on this criteria.

What is BS 7412 and BS EN 7950?

Both of these relate to performance, manufacturing and test standards for windows.

 

BS 7412

BS 7412 tests performance requirements for window assemblies, to achieve the standard a window set is subjected to a series of tests, which include:

    * Wind and water tightness
    * Cycle testing etc

Every component used within the window set tested, must comply to the relevant British Standard for that component before they can be put forward for testing to BS 7412.

BS 7412 is incorporated under the standard BS EN 14351-1:2006 for windows and doors which covers product standards, performance and characteristics.

 

BS 7950

BS 7950 is an enhanced security performance test for window assembly requirements, like BS 7412 every component used within the window set tested must comply to the relevant British Standard for that component.

BS 7950 covers the same requirements as BS 7412 with additional security tests, such as:

    * Manual intervention
    * Mechanical loading
    * Hard and soft body impact

An example of the aggressive of the testing, the mechanical loading tests subjects the door set to 3Kn of pressure, the equivalent of approximately 30 times the pressure used to tighten a car wheel nut.

What is anti-snap, anti-pick, anti-bump, anti-plug extraction and anti-drill?
Article Image

Anti-Snap – the cylinder has a section or sections, often called a sacrificial cut, either side of the central lock mechanism that will come away if the cylinder was to be attacked from the outside, however leaving the remainder of the cylinder mechanism intact and locked.

Anti-Pick – the top half of the pin stack inside the cylinder are designed to include a mushroom shape or indent. Therefore, if something was used to pick the cylinder it would catch on the pins and prevent the cylinder from unlocking.

Anti-Bump – cylinders are designed to have more pins (generally 6) and a shallow pin stack. By doing this it means that if a bump key was knocked into the cylinder, the pins would not jump up meaning the cylinder could not be bumped.

Anti-Plug/Core Extraction – the cylinder has strengthened steel circlips that hold the cylinder in place so the core cannot be extracted from the cylinder.

Anti-Drill – the cylinder has plates and pins built in and this prevents the cylinder core being turned if the pin stack was attacked by a drill. It is designed to break the drill bit and protect the integrity of the cylinder to prevent entry.

What is a Eurogroove?
Article Image

Eurogroove

A Eurogroove is an industry standard feature on most PVCu, aluminium and timber door and window profiles, where the locking devices are fitted.

A Eurogroove is the groove in the profile in which multipoint locks and espagnolettes are fitted. This is always 16mm for PVC, but can be 20mm in Timber.

 

What does a master key suite mean?

This key system is used where you need to provide different levels of access to different people within a building. For example, a system could allow for cleaning staff to be able to unlock all cylinders in an office, but only allow individuals to unlock their personal office door.

How to replace a euro cylinder

Step 1: Open the door and loosen the door handle fixing screws slightly, or remove them and the handles completely

Step 2: Unscrew and remove the cylinder fixing screw

Step 3: Put the key in the cylinder and slightly turn it until the cam tongue is aligned, once this is aligned you can pull the cylinder out, (generally the key will point to around 5 to or 5 past on a clock face)

Step 4: Replace with the new cylinder and then repeat the process in reverse order

How to measure for a replacement euro cylinder
Article Image

 

Step 1: Measure the overall length from the bottom part of the cylinder

Step 2: Measure from the centre screw hole to each end, these two measurements combined should be equal to the overall length

OR

Step 1: Measure from the centre screw hole on the door lock to the face end of the cylinder on each side, these two measurements will be equal to the overall length

 

How do I measure the PZ centre and Backset on a door lock?
Article Image

Centre section of a Multipoint lock illustrating the dimensions

for the Backset and PZ centre

Backset

The backset is the dimension from the front of the faceplate to the centre of the handle spindle or cylinder hole.

The most popular backset sizes are 25mm, 30mm, 35mm and 45mm.

The backset dimension is the distance between A and B on the diagram.

 

PZ Centre

The "PZ" or "Centre" is the distance between the centre of the handle spindle and the centre of the round section of the cylinder. 

The PZ Centre dimension is the dimension between C and D on the diagram.

Multipoint locks can have one or two spindle holes (also known as followers) these type of locks will have two measurements, the most popular being 62mm / 92mm.

Most modern locks with one spindle are 92mm centre, however some older locks may be 70mm or 72mm.

How do I change the handing of a FUHR door bolt?

On most FUHR locks, to change the handing you remove the small grub screw on the side of the lock case adjacent to the latch plate with a 2mm allen key.

Remove the latch and turn in it 180º vertically, place it back into the opening and secure the grub screw back in place.

The FUHR 871 and FUHR 881 door locks are supplied handed, this cannot be changed, so please ensure you order the correct handing for the application.

 

How do I adjust FUHR keeps?
Article Image

Hook and Keep Alignment

Hook and Keep Alignment:

The hook keep should be aligned using the guideline on the hook plate. Ensure the hook engages correctly avoiding friction on which can result in damage to the hook, there should be a 2mm gap between the line on the hook plate and the flat of the hook as shown in the diagram.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latch and Hook Adjustment:

Take care not to over adjust the hook keep as this can damage the keep - do not rotate through 360º.
A screwdriver and a 4mm allen key will be required when adjusting these plates.

Latch and Hook Adjustment           

 

Roller and Mushroom Adjustment:

Adjust eccentric compression of roller and mushroom keeps to ensure the optimum compression for the door.
Adjust the compression using a 4mm allen key.

Roller and Mushroom Adjustment

Can I use one key to open multiple doors?

Yes, this system is called keyed alike. It is where one key can open a group of keyed alike cylinders, so for example someone’s front door key could also unlock their patio doors and back door. All of the euro profile cylinders supplied by Carl F Groupco have the option to be supplied in this way.